Interviews with leading experts recorded at CSHL's
75th Symposium on Nuclear Organization & Function

Interviews recorded May 27 - June 2, 2010, at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Click multimedia links to view interviews or download files to your computer or portable device
All interviews recorded at Cold Spring Harbor, New York June 2010. Copyright (2010) by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

 
GENEVIEVE ALMOUZNI interviewed by Jan Witkowski

After a PhD from the University Pierre & Marie Curie (Paris) with Dr. M. Méchali at the Jacques Monod Institute (Paris, France), and a post-doctoral training at NIH (Bethesda, USA), Geneviève Almouzni established her group at the Curie Institute (Paris, France). Since 1999, she is Head of Department "Nuclear Dynamics and Genome Plasticity" at the Institut Curie (Paris, France), involved in coordinating networks of research within Cancéropôle (France) and at the European level concerning Epigenetics and is Head of Training Unit at the Institut Curie.

She has been interested into the interrelationships between nuclear organisation and the DNA metabolism, including DNA replication repair and transcription. The unifying theme underlying her work is the wish to understand the principles governing nuclear organization and functions. A key issue is how these events are coordinated in order to ensure the maintenance of a cellular identity throughout cell divisions. This is a central question for the field of Epigenetics. A special emphasis is given to developmental context and genotoxic stress to appreciate the importance of factors involved in chromatin dynamics (CAF-1, HIRA, ASF1, histone modifying enzymes). Her interest in the 3D organization of the cell nucleus is aimed at understanding how specific domains like pericentric heterochromatin can be stably maintained. The implications for pathological diseases like cancer are considered throughout the approaches.

ANGELIKA AMON interviewed by Jan Witkowski

Angelika Amon obtained her B. A. with Honors from the University of Vienna in 1989. She conducted her PhD work in the laboratory of Dr. Kim Nasmyth at the Institute of Molecular Pathology in Vienna. There she studied the molecular mechanisms that establish the ordered progression through the cell cycle. She obtained her PhD from the University of Vienna in 1993. After a year in Dr. Franz Klein’s lab at the Institute of Botany at the University of Vienna where she investigated the mechanisms of meiotic recombination, she joined the laboratory of Dr. Ruth Lehmann at the Whitehead Institute as Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellow. In Dr. Lehmann’s lab, Dr Amon studied how germ cells are formed.

In 1996 Dr. Amon accepted a position as a Whitehead Fellow. During her tenure as a Whitehead fellow, Dr. Amon’s laboratory investigated the mechanism of chromosome segregation in budding yeast. Specifically, her lab identified the protein that triggers chromosome segregation by inducing the degradation of a chromosome segregation inhibitor called Securin.

In 1999, Dr. Amon joined the faculty of the Department of Biology and the Center for Cancer Research at MIT. In 2000, she was selected to become an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2002, Dr. Amon was promoted to Associate Professor and awarded tenure in 2004. At the Center for Cancer Research Dr. Amon, studies the molecular mechanisms governing mitotic and meiotic chromosome segregation. In particular, her lab deciphered the molecular mechanisms that control the final stages of mitosis and discovered the molecular mechanisms that generate the meiotic chromosome segregation pattern.

In recognition of her contributions towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of mitotic and meiotic chromosome segregation Dr. Amon was awarded several prizes. In 1999 she was the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. In 2003 she was awarded the Alan T. Waterman award. This award is supported by the National Science Foundation and recognizes the most promising young researcher in any field of science or engineering. In the same year she also won the Eli Lilly and Company Research Award. The Eli Lilly Award is the American Society for Microbiology’s oldest and most prestigious prize and rewards fundamental research of unusual merit in microbiology or immunology by an individual on the threshold of his or her career. Dr. Amon is also the 2007 recipient of the ASBMB-Amgen Award, which is awarded to investigators for significant achievements in the application of biochemistry and molecular biology to the understanding of disease.






STEPHEN BAYLIN interviewed by Sabbi Lall

Born in 1942 in Durham, North Carolina, Stephen Baylin attended Duke University, and earned his M.D. degree at its Medical School, where he completed his internship and first year residency in Internal Medicine. Then he worked for two years at the National Heart and Lung Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In 1971 he joined the departments of Oncology and Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, an affiliation that still continues.

Presently, he is Deputy Director of the Cancer Center, Professor of Medicine and Professor of Oncology. He is also Chief of the Cancer Biology Division of the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, and Associate Director for Research of The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins. He has been a member of committees of the American Cancer Society and of NIH, and his honors include a Research Career Development Award from NIH, the Edwin Astwood Lectureship of the Endocrine Society, and appointment to the Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professorship in Cancer Research and most recently the 2009 Kirk A. Landon-AACR Prize for Basic Cancer Research, also shared with Peter A. Jones, PhD. He is the recently gave 2010 Brecher Lecture at UCSF.

So far, during his highly productive career, Stephen Baylin has authored or co-authored over 300 full-length publications.

WENDY BICKMORE interviewed by Guy Riddihough

Wendy Bickmore
is Head of the Chromosomes and Gene Expression Section at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in Edinburgh, UK. She obtained her PhD at Edinburgh University. During postdoctoral training in Human Genetics, she became fascinated by the structure and organization of chromosomes in the nucleus and went on to show that different human chromosomes have preferred positions in the nucleus, related to their gene content. Current research in Wendy Bickmore’s laboratory focuses on how the spatial organization of the nucleus influences genome function in development and disease. Wendy is an EMBO member and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

GUNTER BLOBEL interviewed by Emilie Marcus

Günter Blobel
is a Professor at the Rockefeller University and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He received an MD from the University of Tübingen in Germany and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. After postdoctoral training with George Palade, he joined the faculty of the Rockefeller University.

Research in Blobel’s laboratory has focused on protein traffic across intracellular membranes. More recently, his laboratory has focused on solving the atomic structure of individual nucleoporins or nucleoporin sub-complexes with the goal to assemble nuclear pore complexes from components, to analyze them by cryo-electron microscopy and to fit in the obtained atomic structures. His laboratory has also worked on integral membrane protein complexes in the nuclear envelope that connect cytoskeletal elements on the cytoplasmic side to heterochromatin on the nucleoplasmic side. These junctions are thought to randomly generate zones of compression and decompression in the nuclear interior and thereby facilitating the huge conformational changes of chromatins required for transcription, DNA replication and repair.

Dr. Blobel received numerous awards, among them the 1999 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.


TITIA DE LANGE interviewed by Emilie Marcus

Titia de Lange
was a graduate student with Piet Borst at the Dutch Cancer Institute where she studied antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei. After receiving her Ph.D. in 1985, she joined the laboratory of Harold Varmus at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. de Lange joined The Rockefeller University in 1990 as an Assistant Professor. She was appointed a tenured Professor in 1997 and the Leon Hess Professor in 1999. She is a Professor of the American Cancer Society and the Associate Director of the Rockefeller University Anderson Cancer Center. Her research is focused on the protective function of mammalian telomeres and their role in aging and cancer.
Dr. de Lange is an elected member of the Dutch Royal Academy of Sciences, the European Molecular Biology Organization, the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Society for Microbiology, the American Academy for Arts and Sciences, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. Among her awards are the inaugural Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the Charlotte Friend Memorial Award and the Clowes Memorial Award of the American Association of Cancer Research, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands.
GARY FELSENFELD interviewed by Emilie Marcus

Gary Felsenfeld
is an NIH Distinguished Investigator in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda. He obtained his Ph.D. in physical chemistry at the California Institute of Technology and carried out postdoctoral work at the Mathematical Institute, Oxford. He has spent most of his career at NIH. Research in Dr. Felsenfeld’s laboratory has focused on the chemistry of interactions between DNA and regulatory proteins, and especially on the relationship between chromatin structure and gene expression. In recent years he has been particularly interested in the function of insulator elements, and the identification of factors that stabilize long range interactions in the nucleus. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1976.

JOSEPH GALL interviewed by Jan Witkowski


Joseph G. Gall completed his Ph.D. in 1952 in the Zoology Department at Yale, working with the Drosophila geneticist Donald F. Poulson. His first faculty position was in the Zoology Department at the University of Minnesota, where he remained for eleven years. In the fall of 1963 he returned to Yale as Professor of Biology with a joint appointment in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry. In 1983 he joined the Embryology Department of the Carnegie Institution in Baltimore as a Staff Member, where he remains today. In 1984 he was appointed American Cancer Society Professor of Developmental Genetics, a lifetime appointment.

His long-term interests have been in the structure and function of the cell, particularly the nucleus. His earliest studies involved the giant lampbrush chromosomes and the amplified nucleoli found in oocytes of frogs and salamanders. In collaboration with his graduate student Mary Lou Pardue, he developed in situ hybridization, now one of the most widely used techniques in cell and developmental biology. Studies on the protozoan Tetrahymena with his postdoctoral fellow Elizabeth Blackburn led to the discovery of the repeated GGGGTT sequence that characterizes the telomeres of most eukaryotic organisms. Most recently Dr. Gall has focused on the structure and function of nuclear bodies, especially the Cajal body and histone locus body.

Dr. Gall was elected president of the American Society for Cell Biology in 1967 and received its E. B. Wilson award in 1983. He was a member of the Corporation (trustee) of Yale University, 1989-1995. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2006 he received the Albert Lasker Special Achievement Award in Medical Research and in 2007 the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize.


SUSAN GASSER interviewed by Richard Sever


Prof. Susan M. Gasser is the director of the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, a position she assumed in 2004. In addition, she was appointed to a professorship at the University of Basel. Her research activities are pursued at the Friedrich Miescher Institute.
Prior to her present position, Dr. Gasser was a Professor of Molecular Biology at the University of Geneva. For the preceding 15 years she had led a research group at the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research.

Dr. Gasser's research interests focus on how nuclear organization impinges on mechanisms of repair and replication fork stability and on epigenetic inheritance of cell fate decisions. Her laboratory combines genome-wide mapping, synthetic lethal screens, quantitative live fluorescence imaging, biochemical reconstitution and standard yeast molecular genetics to address these questions at the molecular and cellular levels. In questions of stem cell determination and epigenetic inheritance, the Gasser group works with C. elegans, to study the
effects of nuclear organization on gene expression during well-characterized cell differentiation events. She has authored more than 200 primary articles and reviews over the last 30 years and has received a number of prizes for her work. Susan M. Gasser studied at the University of Chicago (B.A. Honors in Biophysics) and at the University of Basel (PhD in Biochemistry). She did her postdoctoral studies with U.K. Laemmli at the University of Geneva. She has served on numerous review boards and advisory councils throughout Switzerland and Europe, and served for 3 years as chair of the EMBO Council.


ROBERT GOLDMAN interviewed by Sabbi Lall

Robert D. Goldman, PhD, is the Stephen Walter Ranson Professor and Chairman of the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Dr. Goldman received his PhD in biology from Princeton University and carried out postdoctoral research at the University of London and at the MRC Institute of Virology in Glasgow. He served on the faculties of Case Western Reserve University, Carnegie-Mellon University and was a Visiting Scientist at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory prior to joining Northwestern. He is widely recognized as an authority on the structure and function of the nucleoskeletal and cytoskeletal intermediate filament systems. In the early 1980s he became fascinated with the discovery that lamins were the nuclear form of intermediate filaments. Since that time, his research laboratory has shown that the lamins are involved in determining the size and shape of the nucleus and that they are critically important factors in the disassembly and reassembly of the nucleus during cell division. Within the nucleus, the lamins assemble into a molecular scaffold that plays a vital role in DNA replication, transcription and chromatin organization. In recent years his interest in the lamins has focused on the impact of a number of lamin A mutations that give rise to the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome and other atypical forms of progeria. This has led his research into areas determining the roles of lamins in chromosome organization and positioning during interphase, in regulating the epigenetic modifications of chromatin and in replicative senescence. Dr. Goldman is a recent past President of the American Society for Cell Biology, Director of the Whitman Center of the Marine Biological Laboratory, and he has received a number of honors and awards, including an Ellison Foundation Senior Scholar Award and a MERIT award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

 

JOHN GURDON interviewed by Jan Witkowski

Dr John Gurdon did his undergraduate work in Zoology in the University of Oxford and later a one-year postdoctoral position at CalTech. He returned to Oxford and became a university lecturer in embryology. In 1971 he moved to the MRC molecular biology laboratory in Cambridge, continuing his work on Amphibian developmental biology. In 1983 he moved to the University of Cambridge as John Humphrey Plummer professor of cell biology. He co-founded a research Institute of developmental and cancer biology with Professor Laskey as co-chairman. He remained as Chairman of this Institute until 2002. During his career Dr Gurdon has concentrated on nuclear transplantation in the frog Xenopus. He has also carried out a range of experiments with this material, discovering the value of messenger RNA microinjection, mechanisms of response to morphogen gradients, and, most recently, mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming by Xenopus oocytes and eggs. Dr Gurdon served as Master of Magdalene College Cambridge from 1995-2002. Dr Gurdon has received various recognitions, including, most recently, the Lasker Award for Basic Medical Science.

EDITH HEARD interviewed by Guy Riddihough

Edith Heard is Director of the Genetics and Developmental Biology Department at the Institut Curie (Paris, France). She obtained her PhD at the Imperial Cancer Research Fund (London, UK) and her post-doctoral training at the Pasteur Institute (Paris, France). She was appointed group leader at the Curie Institute in Paris in 2001. Dr. Heard has a long-term interest in epigenetic mechanisms in mammals, and in particular in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. Her work has revealed the remarkable dynamics of X-chromosome inactivation during early mammalian development. She also recently showed that the X chromosome becomes reorganized in the nucleus during the process of X inactivation. Dr. Heard has been awarded the Thoday Prize for Genetics (Cambridge University), the Schlumberger Foundation prize for research, the CNRS Silver Medal, the Jean Hamburger Prize (City of Paris). She was elected as an EMBO member in 2005 and was recently awarded an ERC Advanced Investigator grant.


LYNNE MAQUAT interviewed by Guy Riddihough

Lynne E. Maquat
is a Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics and Director of the Center for RNA Biology at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY. Dr. Maquat obtained her PhD in Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She undertook post-doctoral studies at the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research in Madison, after which she joined the faculty of the Department of Human Genetics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY. She moved her laboratory to the University of Rochester in 2000. Research in Dr. Maquat’s laboratory focuses on mechanisms of RNP remodeling and mRNA decay in mammalian cells. Her work on nonsense-mediated mRNA decay has uncovered the exon-junction complex and the pioneer round of translation. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2006.
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TOM MISTELI interviewed by Richard Sever

Tom Misteli
is an internationally renowned cell biologist. He currently is a Senior Investigator at the National Cancer Institute, NIH, where he heads the Cell Biology of Genomes Group. He obtained his PH. D. from the University of London, UK. During his post-doctoral training at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory he pioneered the use of imaging approaches to study genomes and gene expression in living cells. His laboratory’s current interest is to uncover fundamental principles of spatial genome organization and to apply this knowledge to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cancer and aging. He has received numerous awards including the Gian-Tondury Prize, the NIH Director’s Award and an NIH Merit Award. He acts as an advisor for several national and international agencies and serves on numerous editorial boards including Cell. He is the Editor-in-Chief of The Journal of Cell Biology and of Current Opinion in Cell Biology.

KIM NASMYTH interviewed by Emilie Marcus

Kim Nasmyth
currently holds the Whitley Chair in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Oxford. He obtained his PhD from the University of Edinburgh (1977), was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington, Seattle and was a Robertson fellow at Cold Spring Harbor. After working at the MRC Laboratory of molecular biology in Cambridge for six years, Kim Nasmyth moved in 1987 to the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (I.M.P) in Vienna and was director there from 1997 until 2005. His work has addressed the mechanisms by which genes are turned on and off during development, how DNA replication and the cell division cycle is controlled, and how sister chromatids are held together from S phase until M phase and then disjoined at the onset of anaphase. It has been recognized by several awards including the Gairdner foundation prize (2007), the Boveri award for Molecular Cancer Genetics (2003), the Croonian lecture/Medal of the Royal society (2002), the Austrian Wittgenstein prize (1999), the Louis Jeantet prize for Medicine (1997), the Unilever Science prize (1996), and the FEBS Silver Medal (1995). He is a fellow of the Royal Society (1989), a member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (1999), and a foreign honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1999).
DANIELA RHODES interviewed by Guy Riddihough

Daniela Rhodes
is a group leader in the Structural Studies Division of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK. Dr. Rhodes obtained her PhD in 1982 from the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge University and has remained there, obtaining tenure in 1987. Research in the Rhodes laboratory focuses on chromatin and telomere structure. She has provided some of the first structural information on the telomeric capping structure by deciphering how telomeric proteins such as of yeast Rap1p and human TRF1 and TRF2 recognize and bind telomeric DNA. Throughout her career she has made many contributions to the understanding of chromatin structure and function, most recently on the structure of “30nm” fibre, and on how histone post-translational modifications are recognize and regulate compaction. She was elected EMBO Member in 1996 and Fellow of the Royal Society in 2007.


PAM SILVER interviewed by Jan Witkowski

Pamela Silver is a Professor of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School. She received her PhD in Biochemistry from the University of California. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University where she was a Fellow of the American Cancer Society and The Medical Foundation. Subsequently, she was an Assistant Professor in the Dept of Molecular Biology at Princeton University where she was an Established Investigator of the American Heart Association, a Research Scholar of the March of Dimes and was awarded an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award. She moved to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute where she was a Professor in the Dept of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. She was named a Claudia Adams Barr Investigator and awarded the Mentoring Award for the PhD Program in Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Harvard Medical School. In 2004, she became one of the first members of the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School and the first Director of the Harvard University PhD Program in Systems Biology. In 2009, she became one of the founding members of the Harvard University Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. Her laboratory works in diverse areas of Systems and Synthetic Biology. The main focus areas include the connections between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in disease states that lead to potential therapeutics, predictable design of genetic circuits, and designing sustainability and mutualism.




DAVID SPECTOR interviewed by Richard Sever

David L. Spector, Ph.D.
, Director of Research, and Head of the Gene Regulation and Cell Proliferation Program of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Cancer Center, has been a member of the CSHL faculty since 1985. Dr. Spector’s research centers on understanding the organization and regulation of gene expression in living cells. His laboratory’s work is focused on implementing innovative approaches to elucidate the spatial and temporal aspects of gene expression and in identifying and characterizing the function of nuclear retained long non-coding RNAs. An expert in microscopy, Dr. Spector also directs the Microscopy Shared Resource at CSHL. Dr. Spector has edited numerous microscopy techniques manuals that are used in laboratories throughout the world and he serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Cell Science, Epigenetics & Chromatin, and Current Opinion in Cell Biology. In 2006 he received the Winship Herr Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Watson School of Biological Sciences. He was recently elected to the council of the American Society for Cell Biology.


TIMOTHY STEARNS interviewed by Sabbi Lall


Tim Stearns
is a Professor in the Stanford University Department of Biology, the Stanford University Medical School Department of Genetics, and the Cancer Biology Program. Dr. Stearns received his Ph.D. at MIT, was a postdoctoral fellow at University of California, San Francisco, and joined the Stanford faculty in 1993. Research in Dr. Stearns' lab is focused on the centrosome and cilium, microtubule-based structures that are at the center of cell signaling and cell division. Stearns is the recipient of a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor award, and has taught laboratory courses at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Woods Hole, and internationally in Chile, South Africa, Ghana and Tanzania. He currently holds the Frank Lee and Carol Professorship at Stanford University.


JOAN STEITZ interviewed by Richard Sever

Joan Steitz earned her BS in chemistry from Antioch College in 1963. Significant findings from her work emerged as early as 1967, when her Harvard PhD thesis with Jim Watson examined the test-tube assembly of a ribonucleic acid (RNA) bacteriophage (antibacterial virus) known as R17.

Steitz spent the next three years in postdoctoral studies at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, where she used early methods for determining the biochemical sequence of RNA to study how ribosomes know where to initiate protein synthesis on bacterial mRNAs. In 1970, she was appointed assistant professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale, becoming full professor in 1978. At Yale, she established a laboratory dedicated to the study of RNA structure and function. In 1979, Steitz and her colleagues described a group of cellular particles called small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), a breakthrough in understanding how RNA is spliced. Subsequently, her laboratory has defined the structures and functions of other snRNPs, such as those that guide the modification of ribosomal RNAs and several produced by transforming herpesviruses.

Steitz is an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine. Her many honors include the U.S. Steel Foundation Award in Molecular Biology (1982); the National Medal of Science (1986); the Lewis S. Rosenstiel Award (2002); the FASEB Excellence in Science Award (2003); the RNA Society Lifetime Achievement Award (2004); E.B. Wilson Medal (2005); Gairdner Foundation International Award (2006); Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research, Connecticut Women's Hall of Fame Award, and the New York Academy of Medicine Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Biomedical Science (2008); Honorary Fellow of The New York Academy of Medicine (2009). She is the recipient of 13 honorary degrees.


KEN ZARET interviewed by Sabbi Lall

Ken Zaret is the Joseph Leidy Professor in the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, the Associate Director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and the Co-Director of the Epigenetics Program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Zaret obtained his PhD at the University of Rochester and did postdoctoral studies at the University of California, San Francisco. His laboratory investigates gene function in the context of chromatin and signaling that induces cell type specification in development. His work revealed pioneer transcription factors that expose target gene sequences in progenitor cells and specific signals that induce liver and pancreas fates in mammalian embryos. Ken has been an Editor of the journals MCB and Development, and received a MERIT award from the NIGMS, the Hans Popper Basic Science Award from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the American Liver Foundation, and is a Fellow of the AAAS.
INTERVIEWERS
 
SABBI LALL  

Sabbi Lall
is a Senior Editor at Nature Structural & Molecular Biology. She obtained her PhD at the University of Oxford working on subcellular transcript localization and continued her research examining post-transcriptional gene regulation during early development in Nipam H. Patel's lab at the University of Chicago, then studied microRNA-mediated regulation in C. elegans at New York University. She joined the journal in 2006.

 
EMILIE MARCUS  

Emilie Marcus
is the Editor of Cell and the Editor-in-Chief of Cell Press. She came to the position in 2003 with 5 years of editorial experience at Neuron and after a successful graduate and postdoctoral research career, first at Yale University where she received her PhD and then at the Salk Institute and UCSD. In addition to her role in setting the scientific vision for the journal, she is also responsible for pioneering new publishing policies at Cell Press including the open archive policy established in 1995 that makes content freely available after 12 months and the new “Article of the Future” format for the presentation of articles online that was released early this year. Outside of Cell Press, Emilie has contributed significantly to debates on issues currently facing scientific publishing, including questions about the value and robustness of the peer-review process, handling potential conflicts of interest for authors, reviewers and editors, scientific misconduct and data manipulation, the impact of new information technologies (blogs, wikis and data and text-mining capabilities), new publishing business models, and the uses and abuses of impact factor as a measure of journal quality.

GUY RIDDIHOUGH  

Guy Riddihough
is a senior editor at Science magazine. Previously he has worked as an editor at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Nature Structural Biology, and Nature. He completed his post doctorial research in the laboratory of David Ish-Horowicz, and carried out his post graduate research in the laboratories and Andrew Travers and Hugh Pelham. He received his BSc in Biochemistry from Imperial College, London.
 
RICHARD SEVER  
Richard Sever is currently Acquisitions Editor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. He obtained his PhD at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, having studied Biochemistry as an undergraduate at Oxford University. He has worked an editor on several journals, including Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Trends in Biochemical Sciences and, most recently, Journal of Cell Science, where he was Executive Editor.
 
JAN WITKOWSKI  
Jan Witkowski is Executive Director of the Banbury Center at CSHL, holding some 24 meetings each year, covering topics in molecular and cell biology; human genetics; neuroscience; biotechnology; and societal issues of modern biology. He obtained his Ph.D. in biochemistry at NIMR, London., and carried out postdoc research at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, the Mayo Clinic, and ICRF. He ran a DNA diagnostic laboratory at Baylor College of Medicine before moving CSHL. He has published numerous papers on human genetics and the history of experimental biology and is a coauthor with Jim Watson of the textbook Recombinant DNA: Genes and Genomes. Witkowski is editor-in-chief of Trends in Biochemical Sciences.
 
       
 

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All interviews recorded at Cold Spring Harbor, New York May/June 2009. Copyright (2009) by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

 

 

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